The Fakey-Fell

Let’s be honest – most of us aren’t buying jeans at a price point where we’re going to see a real flat-felled seam.  It’s a multi-step procedure that (optionally, imho) involves an iron.  It also falls down on the job when it comes to curves.  Here’s the cheater version – same great look on the outside, but a whole different process.

Start with right sides together.

Start with right sides together.

Serge the pieces together. I took the way-back picture because I am performing a level of sewing-yoga that hopefully you don't relate to: I'm standing 20" back from the machine, I have just enough room to squeak my foot over to the pedal, and I actually cannot physically get both hands in to the serger at once.  If you can relate to this, then honey, you really need to clean your sewing room!  ;)

Serge the pieces together.
I took the way-back picture because I am performing a level of sewing-yoga that hopefully you don’t relate to: I’m standing 20″ back from the machine, I have just enough room to squeak my foot over to the pedal, and I actually cannot physically get both hands in to the serger at once. If you can relate to this, then honey, you really need to clean your sewin’ room… ;)

Sew a line of stitch at your normal seam allowance.  I am told there are magical home-sew machines out there that can perform these last two steps in one go, but I don't own one.

Sew a line of stitch at your normal seam allowance. I am told there are magical home-sew machines out there that can perform these last two steps in one go, but I don’t own one.

Open up your work and pat the seam allowance to one side.  Do not even *think* of bothering to iron this one.

Open up your work and pat the seam allowance to one side. Do not even *think* of bothering to iron this one.

Your first line of top stitch goes about 1/16" away from the little humpsy-doosie of the seam allowances.

Your first line of top stitch goes about 1/16″ away from the little humpsy-doosie of the seam allowances.

Your second line of top stitch goes about 1/4" away from the first, to the side with all the seam allowances. Instead of cutting threads and returning to the start of the work, I've used the infamous loop-thread-tail-over-finger-and-sew-back method here.  The loop gives me better control at the start of my stitching.

Your second line of top stitch goes about 1/4″ away from the first, to the side with all the seam allowances.
Instead of cutting threads and returning to the start of the work, I’ve used the infamous loop-thread-tail-over-finger-and-sew-back method here. The loop gives me better control at the start of my stitching.

The seam is finished on the outside, and actually slightly more reinforced than a standard fell.

The seam is finished on the outside, and actually slightly more reinforced than a standard fell.

Which one is the real fell? On the outside, it's hard to tell.  (I believe the real one is on top, FWIW.)

Which one is the real fell? On the outside, it’s hard to tell. (I believe the real one is on top, FWIW.)

On the inside, it's pretty gosh-darned obvious.  The real fell is fully encased on both sides of the fabric.  The fakey-fell... Let's just say you wouldn't want to use it with a sheer fabric.

On the inside, it’s pretty gosh-darned obvious. The real fell is fully encased on both sides of the fabric. The fakey-fell… Let’s just say you wouldn’t want to use it with a sheer fabric.

A couple minutes of festivity with some white and gold acrylics, and I have a base design that I'll be adding studs and rivets to.

But on a bustier, or a dance bodice, where you have some predictable curves, that fakey-fell is your friend.

It’s fast, it’s easy, and it’s pretty on the outside.

Leave a Reply